The last 72 holes of the 2019 PGA Golf season featured the top 30 golfers in Fed-Ex Cup points taking on the always tough East Lake Golf Course, which has played host to the final leg of the Fed-Ex Cup since 2004.

Did you tune in?

I bet not. Golf is an acquired taste I’m confident not many of you have acquired. It’s not even close to the NFL or even the NCAA in the sports public’s eye. That you were ignoring it doesn’t matter though because I was tuned in and am thus qualified to tell you a little bit about it.

First a qualifier: I don’t play golf in the actual ‘grip it and rip it’ sense … at least not anymore. I ‘had’ golf many years ago, but they have new drugs so I’m over it now. For me actually playing golf is kinda like getting hit in the head with a hammer: It feels so doggone good when it stops.

The fact I long ago quit hanging with the hack-and-slash crowd does not disqualify me from enjoying the pros as much or more than ever. That’s why I was looking in as much as possible from Friday through Sunday’s final round of the 72-hole FedEx Cup tourney.

Rory McIlroy was challenged mightily Sunday, but as others fell away by virtue of their own pressure cooker gaffes, our hero with the wonderful brogue and rugged good looks from Northern Ireland kept his emotions under and even finished with a birdie putt on the 72nd and last green after shrugging off a couple late bogies.

This tournament was not especially notable for the four days of blow-by-blow from first shot to that final 15 million dollar putt, I’ve seen as good or shot-making drama many times before.

What’s unprecedented and, yes, more than a little bit nuts about this tournament it what it pays starting this year.

Are you sitting down? You better be by the time you read the next sentence: This was the first (but I’ll guess not the last) $15 M-I-L-L-I-O-N golf tournament.

Still seated? That’s good because you still need to wrap your head around the fact $15 million was not the total purse. Fifteen mil is what our fortunate and talented Irish friend took home himself for finishing first.

I don’t know why that clobbered me but it sure did. I don’t deny Rory deserves his money. If sponsors want to pony up that many shekels and hand them over in large lots to fellas who whack a ball with a stick, then go chase it and whack it again … and again … and again, then I say power to them, too.

What do you and buddies play for; a couple bucks a hole? A five spot per side perhaps?

Young Rory pocketed $288,333 for each and every one of the 72 holes he played over the course of his amazing four days of competition.

Xander Schauffele fell off the pace dangerously during the finishing drama, but battled back to second where he settled for a smooth $5 million. Justin Thomas and Brooks Keopka tied for third and took home $3.5 million (that’s apiece by the way). The top eight finishers alone won a combined $33.9 million.

Dustin Johnson did not play up to his usual lofty standards last week. D.J. finished 29th which was good for a solid dead last. Still he covered his Happy Meals and crib at the Super 8 nicely with a check made out in his name for $400,000.

I wonder if D.J. knows there are a few of us out here who won’t make that much this entire year? He on the other hand, earned $400K for last and only had to punch the time clock one long weekend to do it.

Sounds to me like good work if you can get it.

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